shabbitable:

[1/10] GRI’s habits: Always put a headband/hat on maknae

(via yongwonji)


[LOE@LA] 140422 | editing allowed but please credit.for jollie
[LOE@LA] 140422 | editing allowed but please credit.

for jollie

(Source: photojaenic, via asplashofvodka)

Jongup BAP LOE LA (2)

(Source: moonjuppy, via asplashofvodka)

(Source: seugnri, via yongwonji)

alecstasy:

my anonymous friend sent me this and i thought this was really beautiful

alecstasy:

my anonymous friend sent me this and i thought this was really beautiful

(via welcometothetardis)

pickpants-maemae:

Guys this picture is so important to me. Sometimes i back out of cosplaying a character because im worried people will judge me or shame me for doing it because im black. Im constantly worried people wont take my cosplays seriously because im just a black girl dressing up as iconic white characters. And sometimes that fear makes me feel like I shouldnt do it, like cosplaying isnt for me and I shouldnt go to cons.
But meeting this little girl made me understand how important it is to show my love for characters even if they arent my race. This little girl came up to me and asked for a picture at LexCon, and I almost cried. She came up to me the ONLY black Harley in a sea of perfectly “accurate” white Harleys. And I was so happy she did, and so happy I was there. Im glad I chose to cosplay a character I love, and to be there representing black cosplayers, because now this little girl might have a little bit more confidence in herself. Maybe my being there helped this little girl see that even girls like her can be geeky and cosplay whoever they want.
I really hope so. I know this made me feel more confident. And this is a picture im gonna treasure forever!

pickpants-maemae:

Guys this picture is so important to me. Sometimes i back out of cosplaying a character because im worried people will judge me or shame me for doing it because im black. Im constantly worried people wont take my cosplays seriously because im just a black girl dressing up as iconic white characters. And sometimes that fear makes me feel like I shouldnt do it, like cosplaying isnt for me and I shouldnt go to cons.

But meeting this little girl made me understand how important it is to show my love for characters even if they arent my race. This little girl came up to me and asked for a picture at LexCon, and I almost cried. She came up to me the ONLY black Harley in a sea of perfectly “accurate” white Harleys. And I was so happy she did, and so happy I was there. Im glad I chose to cosplay a character I love, and to be there representing black cosplayers, because now this little girl might have a little bit more confidence in herself. Maybe my being there helped this little girl see that even girls like her can be geeky and cosplay whoever they want.

I really hope so. I know this made me feel more confident. And this is a picture im gonna treasure forever!

(via tasteslikewordsalad)

musuheki:

Saki Asamiya (麻宮 彩希) and Shuntaro Yanagi (栁俊太郎) shot by Masahiro Sanbe

(via tasteslikewordsalad)

what experience? ( ಠ◡ಠ )

(Source: jacksonywang, via asplashofvodka)

Among many other things that hinder female idols from getting the respect and recognition they deserve, nothing is scarier and easier to ruin someone’s career and reputation forever than a string of scandals.

What are you seeing? Above are real netizen comments for female idols whose careers are “tainted” because they decided to date, take a photo with a male celebrity, and showed their limit of what they can take. Some of these idol’s images are ruined solely on malicious and at times, baseless rumors like plastic surgery, pregnancy and bullying. These comments range from disbandment threats, sexual harrassment, and overall, just straight up misogyny.

Why should we care? The damaging effects of these comments can greatly affect an idol’s perception of themselves in a negative and unhealthy way. This can affect their performances and variety show appearances, their openness to share things to their fans, etc. They may come to realize that there’s no use of being an idol and quit, or even worse, quit living altogether.

What can we do? Supporting female idols is important. This means giving moral support to them not only during scandals, but during promotions and hiatus, giving financial support by buying their albums, and to not spread malicious rumors around, even if it’s someone we don’t necessarily fancy. Why?

Because female idols are also ladies, just like most of us are. What they feel, we probably feel on a daily basis. Rather than sending hate to them, we should come to understand, sympathize and be there for them because no one else will.

(Source: femaleidols, via melovbb)